Category Archives: Around the World

Your Morning Cup of Links

‘London Bridge is down’: the secret plan for the days after the Queen’s death

Saffron growers look to get a foothold in the U.S.

This. Stop whining.

The French origins of think tanks

Good. More please.

Whitman’s first rule of manliness and health: eat meat

But not people. That’s very unhealthy.

America’s atheists

Conservatism for losers

Camille Paglia predicted 2017

Barbarians and the civilized

Michelangelo’s grave miscalculation

The environmentalist who unintentionally killed millions

Why youth wasn’t enough in Egypt

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Filed under Around the World, History, Politics, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Sex and death in Homer

Otherworldly architecture in Japan’s magical mountainside

Newly discovered Mark Twain children’s story to be released this fall

Submerged in the cosmic kingdom

‘Walden,’ the video game

How the bald eagle became a nuisance

The Spartan way of life

Istanbul: A tale of three cities

How good was Evelyn Waugh?

The Victorian influence on African-American writers 

A nation changed by breakfast

The visual artists who inspired Brahms

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Filed under Around the World, History, Literature, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Sotheby’s goes risqué in first-ever erotic art auction

How Rauschenberg elevated Tiffany’s window displays into an art form

What a time to be alive

An Oxford college sends Renaissance rarities to the U.S.

The United States is an exceptional, extraordinary, unusual place. One day again I hope to have a President who understands that. Instead of a President who says disgraceful things about it and thinks it’s a terrible place.

Joyce among the Jesuits

Terrible women writers

“What is the Democratic party? Is it a genuine political party, or is it simply an instrument of relatively well-off government workers who care about very little other than securing for themselves regular raises and comfortable pensions?”

Great Britain, the litter bin of Europe

The Problem

Thousands of Mark Twain artifacts threatened by mold at author’s historic home undergoing repairs

Cosmic test bolsters Einstein’s “Spooky Action at a Distance”

A history of the oldest but least understood American law enforcement agency: The U. S. Marshals Service

10 sweetest pictures of Pluto from NASA’s latest release

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Filed under Around the World, Art, Literature, Politics, Science, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Why does Trump’s Russia fealty matter? Because it could lead U.S. allies not to share intel, making us less safe.

The Sokal affair will never be anything less than hilarious.

This:

The spasms of student attempts at “decolonization” are almost always ill-conceived…There’s something adorably naive about expecting the major poets of a language that was primarily spoken in one section of one island for half a millennium to be representative of all global voices. No one makes this demand of literature in other languages. We don’t expect to find Welsh, Brazilian, or Caribbean voices among the major Polish language poets…If students really want to encounter classical poetry produced by non-whites, they have options. They can study the relative handful of languages that produced significant literature before the modern period. Hebrew, Arabic, Thai, Chinese, and Urdu come to mind. These are all worthy subjects crying out for more scholarship.

But there’s a catch. And it is what catches our activists out. Studying an ancient language to discover non-white voices is challenging and requires real work. You cannot pass the final exams just by repeating a number of fashionable political slogans. And perhaps activist students do not study these languages because they correctly suspect they won’t find much written in these languages that qualifies as politically correct by the standards of 2017. In fact, you will find in these literatures exactly the kind of messages that activists least like to hear. Lessons like: Humble yourself and mortify your ambitions.

This is lovely.

What a dumb time to be alive

Rand’s plan is the answer, but it will never pass

Police reform, like education reform, is a must. And in both cases, unions are the main problem.

If Pryor is the SCOTUS pick the 4th Amendment will get weaker. He’s a terrible replacement for Scalia.

Lol. Endorse.

These people are insane.

Having an IUD token in the game of Monopoly would solve several longstanding issues. It would emphasize that access to reliable birth control is an important factor that enables people to become real estate magnates in Atlantic City. It’s hard to find the capital, time, and energy to buy up property when you or your partner is unexpectedly pregnant or raising a child, you know. Until now, Monopoly has consistently ignored birth control’s contributions to capitalist society.

The forbidden fruit of Cuba isn’t cigars – it’s rum

So Trump will enter the White House under Senate investigation. For espionage.

Dogs can form autobiographical memories, research suggests

Empire of booze: No nation had more influence on alcohol than 18th-century Britain.

Why some people love snow

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Filed under Around the World, Politics, Science, The Left, Uncategorized

Afternoon Links

The questions that should have been asked at Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing

What a bunch of morons

Saying nice things about your wife is sexist, guys.

Rafsanjani was Iran’s mythical ‘moderate’

Putin’s newest export: terrorists

Russia’s forgotten anti-Stalinist playwright

Chee-Yun’s buried violin

I fail to see the problem with his behavior.

Wow. What a life.

The (social) life of the mind in England

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Filed under Around the World, The Left, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

They “sounded as much like Bernie Sanders supporters as Trump voters.” Lol. Shocking!

Glad to see Tom Cotton has come back to his senses after a brief flirtation with the dipshit brigade.

Italian cop, also a sommelier, teaches wine skills to inmates

Vatican McDonald’s divides opinion

“No one who lived through the Cold War could call those dark and dangerous decades ‘the good old days.’ Hundreds of millions of people lived in political and social repression and economic and spiritual deprivation behind the Iron Curtain. Things were far better in the free world, but the political tension and specter of war, even a nuclear war, were ever-present. What I do miss, however, was the moral clarity that won the Cold War. It has been replaced by a rising tide of moral equivalence as the memories of what real evil looked like have faded.”

A CIA calendar the CIA gift shop refuses to sell? Yes, and here’s the strange story behind it.

“Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Not a nut, not a leftist, and not an irresponsible intellectual”

The need to read

Russia’s new favorite jihadis: The Taliban

What made George Washington different from Benedict Arnold?

Picasso’s self-portraits from the age of 15 to 90

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Filed under Around the World, Art, Foreign Policy, History, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Does this still work if I already have other kinds of alcohol in my hot chocolate?

David Hockney’s pictures

One of the reasons I am not a Jeff Sessions fan

The science of swear words

Mineral baths may have given Stradivari their signature sound

Apparently, “Growing Pains” was one of the first U.S. TV shows to be dubbed and aired in China.

Inside Quebec’s great, multi-million-dollar maple-syrup heist

On the unabashed elitism and riveting writing of Robert Hughes

Hadley Arkes remembers the Chicago of his childhood and how it has changed

World’s oldest gorilla turns 60

How we deal with our dead

The fall of Aleppo and Obama’s shameful legacy

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Filed under Around the World, History, Uncategorized