Category Archives: History

Your Morning Cup of Links

On health care, bipartisan dishonesty is the problem

Exhumation of Salvador Dali’s remains finds his mustache still intact

Goethe: Life as a Work of Art

The limits of a history of the cross in Christian art

Mary Beard on voting in the ancient world

The dumbest thing you’ll read this week

Civil asset forfeiture is un-American and incompatible with a free society

How capitalism saved the bees

Insanity

No, it’s time to actually teach people something in high school, where algebra is supposed to be taught.

Every word of this

“One of the great enduring stupidities of modern economic life is the belief that buying American is somehow beneficial to the United States as a whole.”

What was Wagner like?

“Trump was especially disturbed after learning Mueller would be able to access several years of his tax returns.”

Disband this Party. Unfit to govern.

A new theory of how the moon formed

Hillary’s White House would be no different than Trump’s

Julius Caesar in Gaul

A history of heart surgery

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Filed under History, Literature, Politics, Science, Uncategorized, Unusually Stupid Primates

Afternoon Links

Idea: Don’t do a live-action version. It will be garbage, like all the others have been.

Today in things that shouldn’t have to be explained, but apparently do because Americans have lost their minds

It’s been sad to watch Tucker Carlson’s descent to idiot carnival barker troll. He’s smarter than this, but Trumpism corrupts.

Lol

Game of Thrones: A Game For Our Time

Great job, everyone!

More high school teachers are handing out A’s. But the bad news is that students aren’t necessarily learning more. Recent findings show that the proportion of high school seniors graduating with an A average — that includes an A-minus or A-plus — has grown sharply over the past generation, even as average SAT scores have fallen. In 1998, it was 38.9%. By last year, it had grown to 47%.

That’s right: Nearly half of America’s Class of 2016 are A students. Meanwhile, their average SAT score fell from 1,026 to 1,002 on a 1,600-point scale — suggesting that those A’s on report cards might be fool’s gold.

When did people lose the ability to sit still and silent and focus on one thing for a couple hours? How hard is that? Are we all infants now?

“But we don’t live on an alternate earth, one in which almost any other 2016 Republican candidate for president was elected. We live on this earth, and on Monday, the day that the health-care bill died, the new president was literally playing around in a firetruck on the White House lawn.”

Is film serious art?

Spanish police recover three stolen Francis Bacon paintings

How Pixar lost its way

The return of Italy’s pipe organs

The bizarre world of the Guardian newspaper

Why do we love Jane Austen? Because of her timeless morality.

A history of Mary’s visit to Elizabeth in art

How religion shaped London and its architecture

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Filed under Art, History, Politics, Religion, TV/Movies, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

The president of the United States really just isn’t a very good person. There is no definition of good character that he can meet. You certainly can’t say he’s a man of good character when it comes to sexual behavior. His adulterous past is well-documented. You can’t say he models decency in the way he talks. He’s not honest (you can look it up). He brags about whining his way to winning. He boasts of double-crossing business partners. If you want to say he’s charitable, you should read up on how he used his “charities” as leverage or for publicity stunts. I think we can all agree he’s not humble or self-sacrificing. When asked what sacrifices he’s made, in the context of his spat with the Khan family, he couldn’t name anything save for the fact that he worked very hard to get rich and that he employs people (presumably because it profits him to do so). I don’t know how anyone could absolve him of the charge of vanity or greed. He’s certainly not pious by any conventional definition. Some argue that he’s loyal, and there’s some evidence of that. But the loyalty he shows is instrumental and self-serving.”

First gene therapy – ‘a true living drug’ – on the cusp of FDA approval

Hollywood has a bad movie problem

A pointless argument. They’re both great for different reasons.

“We have our political, economic, and religious disagreements with our friends and allies, but everywhere in the world where people fight against tyranny, we hear an echo of 1776. Everywhere in the world where people risk everything they have to tell the king, führer, caudillo, secretary general of the central committee, dear leader, ayatollah, or president for life to kiss their asses, we see something of ourselves. When things get bad enough, we join in, and have spent untold blood and treasure in the pursuit of other people’s liberty…It is in our nature…It emphatically is not the case, flatulent rhetoric notwithstanding, that the desire for freedom has been planted in every human heart. But where it has been planted, Americans know a kinship beyond blood. When Ronald Reagan demanded of Mikhail Gorbachev ‘Tear down this wall!’ no one asked, ‘What’s in it for us?’ We already knew. We still know.”

Why are whales so big? Scientists may finally have an answer.

Philip Roth on his love of American names

Trump caves to Putin

Queen Victoria’s food

What do dental records tell us about the advantages and disadvantages of living in cities?

Why rare books are thriving in the digital age

The beauty and power of Cape Cod

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Filed under Foreign Policy, History, Science, TV/Movies, Uncategorized

Afternoon Links

Why I don’t bother wading into these “debates” anymore. It’s just dumb tribalists screaming lies. There’s no point.

“I’m glad the Dyke March banned Jewish stars”

It’s time to bring Branwell, the dark Bronte, into the light

The Worst Generation

New book apps

SAD!

Will a 12-part opera distributed online work?

If only someone had warned them

This is so horrible. The horrible – but inevitable – outcome when a society decides to let the state control everything.

The AP investigates its operations in Nazi Germany

The truth about owls

What makes song lyrics poetry?

Alexander von Humboldt’s cosmogony and the Hudson River School

Does democracy die in rudeness?

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Filed under History, Literature, Politics, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

The Lunar Sea: The moon influences life in a surprising and subtle way…with its light.

The Trump family shouldn’t fight Shakespeare. They’ll lose.

Inside the 1950s LSD therapy that changed Cary Grant’s life

Detroit’s DIY cure for urban blight

Do androids dream of electric guitars? Exploring the future of musical A.I.

A history of the Giro d’Italia and what makes it so different from the Tour de France

Lol. Oh the irony.

Yep. Sad!

How the Democrats lost their way on immigration

Is Shakespeare over-lauded, over-performed, and over-taught? 

A history of moonshine

Lol

So, you want a Swiss health care system?

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Filed under Around the World, History, Politics, Science, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Challenge accepted, Canada. Challenge accepted.

Saudi Arabia deports 15,000 Qatari camels

An unusually clear refutation from SCOTUS of the “hate speech is not free speech” nonsense

How did this idiot cop not get convicted? It’s unbelievable. Apparently, cops are a special class of citizen who can just shoot people if they happen to feel afraid. Infuriating.

Makes me sad. Used to be one of my favorite sites.

This common butterfly has an extraordinary sex life

Free speech, the goose, and the gander

The great past of the horse

Prince Philip’s early life

A look at Edgar Allan Poe’s prescient cosmology

Amedeo Modigliani may be the world’s most forged artist

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Filed under Around the World, Art, History, Science, Uncategorized

Afternoon Links

Can anyone repair National Lampoon’s devastated brand?

The empathy of David Brown

How Lego clicked: the super brand that reinvented itself

The truth about tarot

The tragic trumpeter

Comey may have Trump cornered

What a dumb time to be alive

#decline

The accomplishment of Les Misérables rightly understood

Discover your ancient sculptural doppelgänger

A history of the cross as religious symbol and art

Things famous writers didn’t write

Why the blue blood of the horseshoe crab is so important to modern medicine

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Filed under History, Science, Uncategorized