Category Archives: Literature

Your Morning Cup of Links

Inside the world’s first all-female Special Forces unit: Norway’s Jegertroppen

If you watched The Ten Commandments this weekend (as you should have) you’ll find this interesting.

Some sad truth from Harold Bloom:

“I’ve had too many polemics in my life,” he says. “For 50 years I fought the death of humanistic studies in the universities and colleges and, in general, the failure of our intellectual education.” He’s tired of fighting, he says. “We lost the war,” he adds. “All I can do now is a kind of guerrilla action, but in the end there’s only Shakespeare.”

John Tierney argues that no institution has done more to help the poor than Wal-Mart 

A new biography of Martin Luther reveals the life beyond the theses

Who is the biggest publisher of foreign fiction translated into English? Amazon.

How the Pope’s 16th-century chef revolutionized cooking

George Eliot under the microscope

The first Tupperware party, and the woman who made the product a household name

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Your Morning Cup of Links

What a time to be alive

The ‘Fearless Girl’ statue is stupid and I’m sick of hearing about it.

Another reminder that when fascism comes to America our universities will be largely to blame.

Lol

‘Daniel Deronda’: A novel for our time

Digital music tools are reshaping music education

Drunk on aquamarine light

The jewel of conservatism in Netflix’s excellent series ‘The Crown’

What was Machiavelli really like?

The decline of small town France

Henry James in Florence

Remembering Texan pianist Van Cliburn’s upset victory at the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1958 and his subsequent decline

An ice-age squirrel found by Gulag prisoners gets its scientific due

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Your Morning Cup of Links

Alien intelligence: the extraordinary minds of octopuses and other cephalopods

Nearly extinct tigers found breeding in Thai jungle

Jesus Christ, just teach them the canon, FFS.

This will do more harm than good.

“After the health-care debacle, he is proceeding as though he believes that conservatives are his enemies, and he is ready to recruit Democrats, who will bring their policies with them, into that fight. Trump being Trump, nobody knows where he’ll be politically the day after tomorrow, but from one point of view it makes no sense to worry about Trump’s selling out conservatives: He was never a conservative to begin with, and it is impossible to betray principles that one does not in fact hold.”

Notebook written by unknown 17th-century William Shakespeare scholar leaves Antiques Roadshow expert ‘trembling’

Pence’s family practices expose a divide over human nature

Finally, the WORST argument for public funding of the arts

Lincoln the inventor

Norse mythology reimagined

The revival of Yiddish in music and literature

Paris wants to fight terror with culture. Will it work?

Shipwrecked: looking for God in The Ancient Mariner

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Weekend Links

Why no one takes protest art seriously

Tyrannosaurus rex was a sensitive lover, new dinosaur discovery suggests

Capturing the essence of Pushkin

‘To Walk Invisible’ explores the suffering and genius of the Brontë sisters

The Freedom Caucus is the silver lining in the Obamacare debacle

Picasso portrait that became legend of the French Resistance could sell for $50 million

Don’t mock Mike Pence for protecting his marriage. Commend him.

Why Mosul is so hard to take

This is why you probably hate slam poetry, according to a linguistic scholar

Why are ‘doomed’ poets considered better?

Democrats are heading toward an epic miscalculation in filibustering Neil Gorsuch.

How did Monet become so popular?

President James K. Polk’s body may be moved. Again.

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Your Morning Cup of Links

The surprising rising popularity of board games

Netflix to restore and release unfinished Orson Welles film

Unbelievable. Literacy is racist, guys.

The best Sinclair Lewis novels for these crazy times

Franz Kafka’s posthumous short stories

Bosch and Bruegel

The passions of Elizabeth Bishop

The poetry, politics, and madness of Ezra Pound

Mussolini’s last lover 

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Filed under Literature, Poetry, TV/Movies, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Sex and death in Homer

Otherworldly architecture in Japan’s magical mountainside

Newly discovered Mark Twain children’s story to be released this fall

Submerged in the cosmic kingdom

‘Walden,’ the video game

How the bald eagle became a nuisance

The Spartan way of life

Istanbul: A tale of three cities

How good was Evelyn Waugh?

The Victorian influence on African-American writers 

A nation changed by breakfast

The visual artists who inspired Brahms

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Filed under Around the World, History, Literature, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

Saturn’s massive hexagonal storm is revealed up close in stunning new Cassini image

In NBC interview, former President George W. Bush reminds us what it was like to have an adult in charge

North Korea executes five senior officials with antiaircraft guns

ATF agents used a web of shadowy cigarette sales to funnel tens of millions of dollars into a secret bank account

When the enemy of your enemy is – your enemy

What an unbelievably terrible idea

American Girl has forgotten everything that made it unique

Iceland’s hottest new reality TV show is just a live stream of cats

Diary of a Gulag prison guard

On poetry protests and why there are so few well-known conservative poets

Truth and fiction in Jane Austen

“Necessity used to be what forced us to grow up. That was the stick, and sex was the carrot, and between the two of them young men were forced/inspired to get off their asses, go to work, and start families of their own from time immemorial until the day before yesterday.”

Inside the quiet, prophetic politics of C.S. Lewis

Is a preoccupation with equality the most dangerous threat to democracy? Alexis de Tocqueville thought so.

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