Category Archives: Politics

Your Morning Cup of Links

On health care, bipartisan dishonesty is the problem

Exhumation of Salvador Dali’s remains finds his mustache still intact

Goethe: Life as a Work of Art

The limits of a history of the cross in Christian art

Mary Beard on voting in the ancient world

The dumbest thing you’ll read this week

Civil asset forfeiture is un-American and incompatible with a free society

How capitalism saved the bees

Insanity

No, it’s time to actually teach people something in high school, where algebra is supposed to be taught.

Every word of this

“One of the great enduring stupidities of modern economic life is the belief that buying American is somehow beneficial to the United States as a whole.”

What was Wagner like?

“Trump was especially disturbed after learning Mueller would be able to access several years of his tax returns.”

Disband this Party. Unfit to govern.

A new theory of how the moon formed

Hillary’s White House would be no different than Trump’s

Julius Caesar in Gaul

A history of heart surgery

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Literature, Politics, Science, Uncategorized, Unusually Stupid Primates

Afternoon Links

Idea: Don’t do a live-action version. It will be garbage, like all the others have been.

Today in things that shouldn’t have to be explained, but apparently do because Americans have lost their minds

It’s been sad to watch Tucker Carlson’s descent to idiot carnival barker troll. He’s smarter than this, but Trumpism corrupts.

Lol

Game of Thrones: A Game For Our Time

Great job, everyone!

More high school teachers are handing out A’s. But the bad news is that students aren’t necessarily learning more. Recent findings show that the proportion of high school seniors graduating with an A average — that includes an A-minus or A-plus — has grown sharply over the past generation, even as average SAT scores have fallen. In 1998, it was 38.9%. By last year, it had grown to 47%.

That’s right: Nearly half of America’s Class of 2016 are A students. Meanwhile, their average SAT score fell from 1,026 to 1,002 on a 1,600-point scale — suggesting that those A’s on report cards might be fool’s gold.

When did people lose the ability to sit still and silent and focus on one thing for a couple hours? How hard is that? Are we all infants now?

“But we don’t live on an alternate earth, one in which almost any other 2016 Republican candidate for president was elected. We live on this earth, and on Monday, the day that the health-care bill died, the new president was literally playing around in a firetruck on the White House lawn.”

Is film serious art?

Spanish police recover three stolen Francis Bacon paintings

How Pixar lost its way

The return of Italy’s pipe organs

The bizarre world of the Guardian newspaper

Why do we love Jane Austen? Because of her timeless morality.

A history of Mary’s visit to Elizabeth in art

How religion shaped London and its architecture

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, History, Politics, Religion, TV/Movies, Uncategorized

Afternoon Links

Why I don’t bother wading into these “debates” anymore. It’s just dumb tribalists screaming lies. There’s no point.

“I’m glad the Dyke March banned Jewish stars”

It’s time to bring Branwell, the dark Bronte, into the light

The Worst Generation

New book apps

SAD!

Will a 12-part opera distributed online work?

If only someone had warned them

This is so horrible. The horrible – but inevitable – outcome when a society decides to let the state control everything.

The AP investigates its operations in Nazi Germany

The truth about owls

What makes song lyrics poetry?

Alexander von Humboldt’s cosmogony and the Hudson River School

Does democracy die in rudeness?

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Literature, Politics, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

The Lunar Sea: The moon influences life in a surprising and subtle way…with its light.

The Trump family shouldn’t fight Shakespeare. They’ll lose.

Inside the 1950s LSD therapy that changed Cary Grant’s life

Detroit’s DIY cure for urban blight

Do androids dream of electric guitars? Exploring the future of musical A.I.

A history of the Giro d’Italia and what makes it so different from the Tour de France

Lol. Oh the irony.

Yep. Sad!

How the Democrats lost their way on immigration

Is Shakespeare over-lauded, over-performed, and over-taught? 

A history of moonshine

Lol

So, you want a Swiss health care system?

Leave a comment

Filed under Around the World, History, Politics, Science, Uncategorized

Your Morning Cup of Links

If you’re surprised that half of Americans don’t know where chocolate milk comes from, you haven’t been paying attention for the last year.

The right continues to become the left. They even have their own “I need a safe space” anti-free speech hecklers now. Pathetic. It’s like a Pandora’s Box of stupid has opened in this country in the last year. “Hey guys, there’s a play about the dangers of mob response to misguided political violence. Let’s be that mob!” Truly the dumbest time to be alive. (P.S. It’s an anti-assassination play, guys.)

This woman is a bitch, but she didn’t kill anyone. This verdict is absurd. As is this one, but I think we all saw it coming.

This secretive billionaire makes the cheese for Pizza Hut, Domino’s, and Papa John’s

Bermuda’s laid-back allure

The scariest thing about the Congressional baseball shooter? His politics weren’t that odd, and his Facebook wasn’t that weird.

The first thing to say about the attempted massacre of congressional Republicans on a baseball field in suburban Virginia is that the motivations of the shooter were unusual. By which I mean that, based on what we know, James Hodgkinson had surprisingly normal political beliefs. He hated Donald Trump, he liked Bernie Sanders, he wanted higher taxes on the wealthy. He was not a Communist or a paranoid knight on a shadowy crusade, but an ordinary Midwestern Democrat with far more rage but the same frustrations as many decent liberals. Where modern assassinations are concerned, such normal partisan motivations are more unusual than you might think.

Hodgkinson’s seeming normalcy, his angry but relatively mainstream Democratic views, might be a warning sign for the future of our politics. The turmoil of the 1960s and 1970s generated segregationist terrorism on the right and a revolutionary underground on the left, but it did not produce much partisan terrorism, violence inspired simply by fear and hatred of the opposition party. Now, though, we hate each other simply for being Democrats and Republicans more than ever — and violence inspired simply by the polarization of the major parties would be a unique and novel threat.

We have the space to keep our bearings — which includes remembering that hot political rhetoric is a normal part of high-stakes debate, that lies are wicked but insults are very small-d democratic, that comparing self-aggrandizing presidents to Caesars is as American as apple pie, and that martial metaphors are not incitement. Only incitement is incitement. Police what you say for lies, for slander, for stupidity, for simple vileness. Don’t be Sean Hannity; don’t be Kathy Griffin. Abjure the sword, the gun, the bomb. But don’t parse your every word for what a maniac might make of it. This is a free country, and still, thank God, a mostly peaceful one. Say what you believe.

“If we follow the course we are on, we will see more unhappiness, more violence, more repressive national-security policies, less prosperity, less freedom, and less of anything that looks like the quite-good-enough America we already have….So, the election didn’t go your way. That means America is finished, defeated, corrupted beyond redemption? Grow up. Nobody said being free would be easy. We, all of us, have work to do — childish fantasies and childish temper tantrums aren’t getting it done. The next time you feel yourself tempted to call one of your fellow Americans a “traitor,” you should give some serious consideration to the infinitely preferable option of keeping your damned-fool mouth shut.”

Oh no, I hope they don’t bring value and convenience to American food consumption. That would be just terrible.

From Russia with blood

“The Bell Tolls For ‘Whom'” #TeamWhom

The Whitney’s identity problem

The reality of Joyce’s Ulysses

Why do Americans smile so much?

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Around the World, Politics, Uncategorized, Unusually Stupid Primates

Weekend Links

You’re supposed to be the grown-ups of the English-speaking peoples, UK. What the hell are you doing? Is there a worse politician in the world than Theresa May?

Elite high schools plot to undermine college admissions

India’s book-buying habits say a lot about the country’s economy

“The narrative the Democrats desperately want is that Trump is under FBI investigation for criminal activity that invalidates the 2016 election, and has committed impeachable offenses. The facts they actually have are a lot less sexy: a president who wouldn’t respect the FBI’s independence and couldn’t understand why the FBI Director couldn’t publicly exonerate him when he wasn’t under investigation. But those facts are ugly enough in what they say about Trump’s ability to run a government that inspires confidence in the impartial administration of justice.”

How the remains of five Archbishops of Canterbury were found by accident

Pet rats

Comey’s testimony was a self-inflicted disaster for Trump

Babies can recognize faces while still in the womb, scientists find

Expats flood Valencia

Is it wrong to tidy up Emily Dickinson’s “torturous” punctuation?

Torching the modern-day Library of Alexandria

Caravaggio’s compassion

Seoul’s Brutalist revival

Leave a comment

Filed under Around the World, Art, Politics, Science, Uncategorized

Afternoon Links

How a Galapagos bird lost the ability to fly

Hunting down the lost apples of the Pacific Northwest

How does the brain recognize faces? Scientists now know.

So embarrassing

The cult of Trump masks the failure of this administration

America doesn’t have a successor

The idea that acting like a grown-up is “antiquated” and shouldn’t be encouraged is a big part of the Left’s problem.

What is the function of criticism?

Don’t let the Left’s hysteria keep us from stewarding nature

Inside the fight for Mosul

The untold story of the audiobook

The enduring appeal of personal letters

Where do pianists look when they play?

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Science, The Left, Uncategorized