Category Archives: TV/Movies

Afternoon Links

I’m glad the NYT publishes this stuff, but nothing will change. Americans have to learn the hard way. And we’re going to be in a world of pain in the coming decades.

A public university president in Oregon gives new meaning to the idea of a pensioner.

Joseph Robertson, an eye surgeon who retired as head of the Oregon Health & Science University last fall, receives the state’s largest government pension.

It is $76,111.

Per month.

New “Lost In Space” stirs memories of campy cult classic

Sounds like I’ll be watching the new “Civilisations” show mostly on mute because the Left has to ruin everything.

“If we were on Earth-2 and President Mitch Daniels were in office and Republicans were enjoying the luxury of a boring and mature presidency that was tackling head-on the Sweet Fiscal Crisis of Death coming our way, the pull of Ryan’s family might not have been nearly so acute…As a general rule, whether you’re on the right or the left, if you personally hate Paul Ryan, that’s an indicator to me that you’re an unreasonable person. Sure, you can disagree with him. You can be disappointed in him. But if you buy the claptrap from the Krugmanite Left or the Bannonite Right about Ryan, if you think he’s evil or a fraud, I’m going to assume you’re part of the problem in our politics.”

Behold, the stupidest thing you’ll read this month. Delicious food at low prices with excellent customer service but OH NOES THEY’RE CHRISTIANS AND THEY MOCK COWS. DRIVE THEM OUT OF THE CITY! Get a life, people.

Sadly, this is true. 

Why I laugh when teachers want to get paid more.

More than one-fifth of millennials in the U.S. — 22 percent — haven’t heard of, or aren’t sure if they’ve heard of, the Holocaust, according to a study published Thursday…Additionally, two-thirds of millennials could not identify in the survey what Auschwitz was. 41 percent of millennials believe two million Jews or fewer were killed during the Holocaust, the study found. Six million Jews were killed in World War II by Nazi Germany and its accomplices.

This is stupid.

I would love to watch a good movie about this woman.

Almost everyone over 30 somehow survived this “controversial” method of parenting. Back then, it was called “parenting.”

This story is insane.

Good on the White Sox. Can’t imagine what this guy has been through.

The Red Atlas: How the Soviet Union secretly mapped the world

A history of seven buildings between 105th and 106th street in Manhattan

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Your Morning Cup of Links

The escape of Charles II to France

A new biography of Grant

THE DOG PATRIARCHY MUST BE STOPPED

Everything about this story is ridiculous. Especially the “I had a bump on my neck once that turned out to be nothing, so now I need an emotional support rodent to fly with me” part.

We’re raising a generation of idiots and calling it progress.

Solzhenitsyn’s cathedrals

The truth and fiction of Adam and Eve

Massive ancient underground city once housed 20,000 people

Google X and the science of radical creativity

How The Princess Bride built film’s most beloved sword fight

The volatile friendship of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon

A “horrifying and engrossing” history of madness at sea

Is the traditional Western a thing of the past?

The man who invented Bailey’s

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Your Morning Cup of Links

The anthology show is back

Dante as theologian

Yep

Indeed. More please.

How air conditioning changed the world

The Porn President

Why are so few classic films available on Netflix?

The problem with teaching today

A wonderful new account of 19th century Britain

The insanity of addiction

“Trump is a familiar sort of man who mistakes being hard for being a sadist, and thinks that his own well-documented appetite for inflicting suffering and humiliation on others makes him tough.”

The consolations of Latin

The pleasures and secrets of library archives

Is the golden age of astronomy nearly over?

What’s wrong with Catholic fiction today?

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Weekend Links

Why truckers love NPR

A guide to the plants of Tolkien’s Middle Earth

Should one always obey the wishes of late authors to destroy unpublished work?

A history of tea and how European colonization changed the Western diet

How Buffy The Vampire Slayer redefined TV storytelling

When things go missing

How Instagram is changing restaurant design

What a dumb time to be alive

The fight over women’s basketball in Somalia

The untold story of the Astros’ rainbow uniforms

Why everyone loves blue

A history of Europe’s four winds

The real Gus Grissom

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Your Morning Cup of Links

People are trash. I can’t remember the last time I went to a movie or play and someone wasn’t talking or looking at their phone. What happened to manners?

The surprising joy of Stranger Things: “But the nostalgia of Stranger Things isn’t just for an era, really: It’s for a feeling. That feeling is intimately connected, weirdly enough, with bicycles — and, by extension, the reckless sort of freedom rarely found in childhood today.”

On the same subject:

It’s the same reason everyone loves “Casablanca” and “It’s a Wonderful Life” but merely appreciate “Citizen Kane.” Rick Blaine and George Bailey make us feel things. They help us see in the most basic way that altruism is a fundamental part of life, that giving ourselves makes us more complete. Our country seems more divided every day. And then out of nowhere comes this weird little show. And it doesn’t divide us. It isn’t controversial. It’s just nice. It’s about things we can all agree on. It could not have come along at a more perfect time. For that reason, it doesn’t matter if it ages well. Sometimes things need to be of their times. And sometimes the best way to serve our times is to tell a story that happened a long, long time ago in a decade that seems far away.

How a trove of Nazi art wound up under lock and key on an Army base in Virginia

What’s beneath New York City? Nobody knows.

The marvels of British realist painting

The man who studied the sun’s puzzling heat

Tom Ricks on revising his book on Churchill and Orwell

The lost pleasure of reading aloud

Why do people hike?

What to do with Heligoland?

What was Edgar Degas like?

How smartphones have ruined the museum experience

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Filed under Art, History, Literature, TV/Movies, Uncategorized, Unusually Stupid Primates

Your Morning Cup of Links

Can Amazon keep competing with so many competitors?

Politics overtake the Met

Why do people even go to college anymore? It’s certainly not to learn. Don’t waste your money. “You haven’t studied anatomy (because it’s racist obvs), but here’s a medical degree anyway.” We can’t be too far away from that at this point.

Will we ever know what dark matter is?

Goddamn it, NO. “Let’s take something good and ruin it” seems to be the only idea Hollywood has these days.

The Next Lost Cause

Sex Cells

The King of Audiobooks

The man who keeps Monet’s gardens growing

When Milton met Galileo

 

 

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Afternoon Links

How did the war against poaching elephants become a war on ivory?

The end of families gathering around the TV

The fascinating artifacts found in Europe’s receding glaciers

How the Old Masters became the Old Masters

The gentleman Nazi

The return of U.S. Chess

Why classical music is the best music

The invisible poems hidden in one of the world’s oldest libraries

Fools

“The greatest film review I’ve ever read”

Yep. Embarrassing.

What fresh hell is this

Sargent’s watercolors

Thomas Gainsborough’s dazzling vision

 

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